Out of the Past

Thoreau

June 3






Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau
American Writer

Woodland Canopy by Harold Joiner
Flora Cowberry Bilberry Whortleberry

c1880
Old Fallen Tree
Old Fallen Tree
Three Years in Canada. An account of the actual state of the country in 1826-7-8, etc.
Three Years in Canada
An account of the actual state of the country in 1826-7-8, etc.by John mactaggart

Walden & Civil Disobedience
Walden & Civil Disobedience

New England Beyond Criticism
New England Beyond Criticism
In Defense of Americas First Literature
Walden
Walden

Thumbing Through Thoreau
Thumbing Through Thoreau
A Book of Quotations by Henry David Thoreau

On The Study Of Words by Richard C. Trench
On The Study Of Words
by Richard C. Trench

Walden
Walden
Kindle Edition


Walden, or Life in the Woods Poster
Walden, or Life in the Woods

Poster


Kindle
Kindle
6" Display, U.S. & International Wireless



         

Dr. Harris suggests that the mountain cranberry which I saw at Ktaadn was the cowberry, because it was edible, and not the bear-berry, which we have in Concord.

Saw the perfoliate bellwort in Worcester near the hill; an abundance of mountain laurel on thehills, now budded to blossom and the fresh lighter growth contrasting with the dark green; an abundance of very large checkerberries, or partridgeberries, as Bigelow calls them, on Hasnebumskit. Sugar maples about there. A very extensive view, but the western view not so much wilder as I expected. See Barre, about fifteen miles off, and Rutland, etc., etc.

Not so much forest as in our neighborhood; high, swelling hills, but less shade for the walker. The hills are green, the soil springier; and it is written that water is more easily obtained on the hill than in the valleys. Saw a Scotch fir, the pine so valued for tar and naval uses in the north of Europe.


John Mactaggart finds the ice thickest not in the largest lakes in Canada, nor in the smallest, where the surrounding forests melt it. He says that the surveyor of the boundary-line between England and United States on the Columbia River saw pine trees which would require sixteen feet in the blade to a cross-cut saw to do anything with them.




I examined to-day a large swamp white oak in Hubbard's meadow, which was blown down by the same storm which destroyed the lighthouse. At five feet from the ground it was nine and three fourths feet in circumference; the first branch at eleven and a half feet from ground; and it held its size up to twenty-three feet from the ground. Its whole height, measured on the ground, was eighty feet, and its breadth about sixty-six feet. The roots on one side were turned up with the soil on them, making an object very conspicuous a great distance off, the highest root being eighteen feet from the ground.

1851

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