Out of the Past


Thoreau

May 21






and Other Natural History Essays

Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau
American Writer

Fishes, Reptiles and Amphibians by Dr. Aug. Schleyer; Berlin, 1890
Fishes, Reptiles and Amphibians
by Dr. Aug. Schleyer; Berlin. 1890

Asa Gray
Asa Gray
American Botanist, Friend of Darwin

New England Beyond Criticism
New England Beyond Criticism
In Defense of Americas First Literature
Walden
Walden

Thumbing Through Thoreau
Thumbing Through Thoreau
A Book of Quotations by Henry David Thoreau

On The Study Of Words by Richard C. Trench
On The Study Of Words
by Richard C. Trench

Thoreau the Land Surveyor
Thoreau the Land Surveyor

Walden
Walden
Kindle Edition


Walden, or Life in the Woods Poster
Walden, or Life in the Woods

Poster


Kindle
Kindle
6" Display, U.S. & International Wireless



         
Wednesday. Yesterday I made out the black and the white ashes. A double male white ash in Miles's Swamp, and two black ashes with sessile leaflets. A female white ash near railroad, in Stow's land. The
white ashes by Mr. Pritchard's have no blossoms, at least as yet.

If I am right, the black ash is improperly so called, from the color of its bark being lighter than the white. Though it answers to the description in other respects, even to the elder-like odor of the leaves, I should like still to see a description of the yellow ash.

I have heard now within a few days that peculiar dreaming sound of the frogs' which belongs to the summer - their midsummer night's dream.

The frog had eyed the heavens from his marsh, until his mind was filled with visions, and he saw more than belongs to this fenny earth. He mistrusted that he was become a dreamer and visionary. Leaping across the swamp to his fellow, what was his joy and consolation to find that he too had seen the same sights in the heavens, he too had dreamed the same dreams!





I think that the existence of man in nature is the divinest and most startling of all facts. It is a fact which few have realized

Who shall say that there is no God, if there is a just man. It is only within a year that it has occurred to me that there is such a being actually existing on the globe. Now that I perceive that it is so, many questions assume a new aspect. We have not only the idea and vision of the divine ourselves, but we have brothers, it seems, who have this idea also.

Methinks my neighbor is better than I, and his thought is better than mine. There is a representative of the divinity on earth, of [whom] all things fair and noble are to be expected. We have the material of heaven here. I think that the standing miracle to man is man. Behind the paling yonder, come rain or shine, hope or doubt, there dwells a man, an actual being who can sympathize with our sublimest thoughts.

The revelations of nature are infinitely glorious and cheering, hinting to us of a remote future, of possibilities untold; but startlingly near to us some day we find a fellow-man.


1851

Twitter Updates
follow Thoreau on Twitter

Other Entries
January 4
January 6
January 7
January 10
January 11
January 21
January 23
January 24
January 27
January 29
January 30
February 3
February 6
February 9
February 21
February 23
February 25
March 1
March 4
March 5
March 7
March 11
March 12
March 13
March 14
March 15
March 19
March 27
March 29
March 31
April 1
April 3
April 7
April 9
April 11
April 19


May 1
May 3
May 7
May 9
May 10
May 11
May 16
May 19
May 20
May 21
May 24
May 26
May 27
May 29
May 31
June 3
June 9
June 10
June 11
June 14
June 16
July 4
July 15
August 13
August 15
August 16
August 18
August 20
August 22
August 23
September 1
September 26
September 29


June 3
June 9
June 10
June 11
June 14
June 16
July 4
July 15
July 24
August 13
August 15
August 16
August 18
August 20
August 22
August 23
September 1
September 26
September 29
October 13
October 20

October 23-28
October 29
November 1
November 6
November 10
November 11
November 14
November 20
November 25
November 26
November 27
December 2
December 6
December 16
December 17
December 19
December 31


Outrider