Out of the Past


Thoreau

May 16






and Other Natural History Essays

Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau
American Writer

Whip-Poor-Will
Whip-Poor-Will

Moonlight by Maxwell Dickson
Moonlight
by Maxwell Dickson
New England Beyond Criticism
New England Beyond Criticism
In Defense of Americas First Literature
Walden
Walden

Thumbing Through Thoreau
Thumbing Through Thoreau
A Book of Quotations by Henry David Thoreau

On The Study Of Words by Richard C. Trench
On The Study Of Words
by Richard C. Trench

Thoreau the Land Surveyor
Thoreau the Land Surveyor

Walden
Walden
Kindle Edition


Walden, or Life in the Woods Poster
Walden, or Life in the Woods

Poster


Kindle
Kindle
6" Display, U.S. & International Wireless



         
Heard the whip-poor-will this evening. A splendid full moon to-night. Walked from 6:30 to 10 p.m. Lay on a rock near a meadow, which had absorbed and retained much heat, so that I could warm my back on it, it being a cold night. I found that the side of the sand-hill was cold on the surface, but warm two or three inches beneath.

If there is a more splendid moonlight than usual, only
the belated traveller observes it . When I am outside, on the outskirts of the town, enjoying the still majesty of the moon, I am wont to think that all men are aware of this miracle, that they too are silently worshipping this manifestation of divinity elsewhere. But when I go into the house I am undeceived; they are absorbed in checkers or chess or novel, though they may have been advertised of the brightness through the shutters.



In the moonlight night what intervals are created! The rising moon is related to the near pine tree which rises above the forest, and we get a juster notion of distance. The moon is only somewhat further off and on one side. There may be only three objects, - myself, a pine tree, and the moon, nearly equidistant.

Talk of demonstrating the rotation of the earth on its axis, - see the moon rise, or the sun!

The moonlight reveals the beauty of trees. By day it is so light and in this climate so cold commonly, that we do not perceive their shade. We do not know when we are beneath them.

1851

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