Out of the Past
Thoreau
February 21






Costumes and Masks
Henry David Thoreau
American Writer

Squirrel Tracks in Snow
Squirrel Tracks in Snow
New Fallen Snow on Conifer Trees Reflect Sunlight in the Forest
New Fallen Snow on Conifer Trees Reflect Sunlight in the Forest
Frozen River by Ruane Manning
Frozen River
 by Ruane Manning
Thoreau at Walden
Thoreau at Walden
by John Porcellino

Journal, Volume 5
Journal
Volume 5

Wild Fruits
Wild Fruits
Thoreau's Rediscovered Last Manuscript

Walden, or Life in the Woods Poster
Walden, or Life in the Woods
Poster

Our Common Dwelling
Our Common Dwelling
Henry Thoreau, Transcendentalism, and the Class Politics of Nature

Autumnal Tints
Autumnal Tints
Audio CD
Reading by Brett Barry.


Kindle
Kindle
6" Display, U.S. & International Wireless



         

A. M. - A fine, driving snow-storm. Have seen no good samples of the blue in snow this winter. At noon clears up.

P.M. - To Goose Pond by Tuttle Path. A little snow, lodged on the north side of the woods, gives them a hoary aspect - a mere sugaring, however. The snow has just ceased falling - about two inches deep, in the woods, upon the old and on bare ground; but there is scarcely a track of any animal yet to be seen, except here and there the surface of the snow has been raised and broken interruptedly where some mouse came near the surface in its travels, and in one wood I see very numerous tracks, probably of red squirrels, leading to and from three or four holes in the earth close together, somewhat like those in an ant's nest - quite a broad beaten path to some stumps with white pine cones on them and single tracks to the base of trees.

It has now got to be such weather that after a cold morning it is colder in the house - or we feel colder - than outdoors, by noon, and are surprised that it is no colder when we come out.

You cannot walk too early in new-fallen snow to get the sense of purity, novelty, and unexploredness. The snow has lodged more or less in perpendicular lines on the northerly sides of trees, so that I am able to tell the points of compass as well as by the sun. I guide myself accordingly.




It always gladdens me to see a willow, though catkinless as well as leafless, rising above the new-fallen, untrodden snow, in some dry hollow in the woods, for then I feel nearer to spring. There are some peculiarly dry and late looking ones I see there, but it is enough that they are willows.

The locust pods are open or opening. Little beans they hold. What delicate satin-like inside linings they have!

1854

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