Out of the Past
Thoreau
November 27






Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau
American Writer

Putorius vison, Mink
Putorius vison, Mink
Wolves
Wolves
Walden and Other Writings
Walden and Other Writings

An Insect View of Its Plain
An Insect View of Its Plain
Insects, Nature and God in Thoreau, Dickinson and Muir 
H.D. Thoreau
H. D. Thoreau, a Writer's Journal
Thoreau in His Own Time
Thoreau in His Own Time
A Biographical Chronicle of His Life, Drawn from Recollections, Interviews, and Memoirs by Family, Friends, and Associates 

Walden
Walden




         

By river to J. Farmer's .
He gave me the head of a gray rabbit which his boy had snared. This rabbit is white beneath, the whole length, reddish-brown on the sides, and the same spotted with black, above; the hairs coarse and homely, yet the fur beneath thick and slate-colored as usual.
Well defended from the cold. Sides I might say pale brick-color, the brown part. The fur under the feet dirty-yellowish, as if stained by what it trod upon. He makes no use of their skins or fur. The skin is very tender. The tail, short and curled up, is white on the inside.

He showed ine the preserved skin of the heads of a double-headed calf, still-born, also the adjoining portion of the spine, where two short spinal columns, two or three inches long, merged in one. Only one body and other organs.

I told him I saw a mink. He said he would have given me $1.50 and perhaps something more for him. 




I hear that he gives $1.75, and sells them again at a profit. They are used to trim ladies' coats with, among other things. A mink skin which he showed me was a darker brown than the one I saw last (he says they changed suddenly to darker about a fortnight since); and the tail was nearly all black.

 He said that his grandfather, who could remember one hundred and twenty-five years before this, told him that they used to catch wolves in what is now Carter's pasture by the North River (east of Dodge's Brook) in this manner: They piled up logs, cob-house
fashion, beginning with a large base, eight or ten feet square, and narrowing successively each tier, so as to make steps for the wolves to the top, say ten feet high. Then they put a dead sheep within. A wolf soon found it in the night, sat down outside and howled till he called his comrades to him, and then they ascended step by step and jumped down within; but when they had done they could not get out again. 'They always found one of the wolves dead, and supposed that he was punished for betraying the others into this trap.

A man in Brighton, whom he fully believes, told him that he built a bower near a dead horse and placed himself within to shoot crows. One crow took his station as sentinel on the top of the tree, and thirty or forty alighted upon the horse. He fired and killed seven
or eight, but the rest, instead of minding him, immediately flew to their sentinel and pecked him to pieces before his eyes. Also Mr. Joseph Clark told him that, as he was going along the road, he cast a stick over the wall and hit some crows in a field, whereupon they flew directly at their sentinel on an apple tree and beat and buffeted him away to the woods as far as he could see.

There is little now to be heard along the river but the sedge rustling on the brink. There is a little ice along most of the shore throughout the day.
November 27, 1855

Twitter Updates
follow Thoreau on Twitter

Other Entries

January 4
January 6
January 7
January 10
January 11
January 21
January 23
January 24
January 27
January 29
January 30
February 3
February 6
February 9
February 21
February 23
February 25
March 1
March 4
March 5
March 7
March 11
March 12
March 13
March 14
March 15
March 19
March 27
March 29
March 31
April 1
April 3
April 7
April 9
April 11
April 19

May 1
May 3
May 7
May 9
May 10
May 11
May 16
May 19
May 20
May 24
May 26
May 27
May 29
May 31
June 3
June 9
June 10
June 11
June 14
June 16
July 4
July 15
August 13
August 15
August 16
August 18
August 20
August 22
August 23
September 1
September 26
September 29


June 3
June 9
June 10
June 11
June 14
June 16
July 4
July 15
July 24
August 13
August 15
August 16
August 18
August 20
August 22
August 23
September 1
September 15
September 26
September 29
October 11
October 13
October 20
October 23
October 24
October 26
Occtober 27
October 29
October 30
November 1
November 6
November 8
November 9
November 10
November 11
November 13
November 14
November 20
November 25
November 26
November 27
December 2
December 6
December 16
December 17
December 19
December 31



Outrider