Out of the Past

Thoreau
November 13






and Other Natural History Essays

Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau
American Writer

Geese Flying in Formation
Geese Flying in Formation
Mink Swimming
Mink Swimming
Walden and Other Writings
Walden and Other Writings

H.D. Thoreau
H. D. Thoreau, a Writer's Journal


Thoreau in His Own Time
Thoreau in His Own Time
A Biographical Chronicle of His Life, Drawn from Recollections, Interviews, and Memoirs by Family, Friends, and Associates 

Walden
Walden


In mid-forenoon (10:45), seventy or eighty geese, in three harrows successively smaller, flying southwest - pretty well west - over the house. A completely overcast, occasionally drizzling forenoon. I at once heard their clangor and rushed to and opened the window. The three harrows were gradually formed into one great one before they were out of sight, the geese shifting their places without slacking their progress.

To Cardinal Shore.
Going over Swamp Bridge Brook, I saw in the pond by the roadside, a few rods before me, the sun shining bright, a mink swimming, the whole length of his back out. It was a rich brown fur, glowing internally as the sun fell on it, like some ladies' boas, not black, as it sometimes appears, especially on ice. It landed within three rods, showing its long, somewhat cat-like neck, and I observed was carrying something by its mouth, dragging it overland. 




At first I thought it a fish, maybe an eel, and when it had got half a dozen feet, I ran forward, and it dropped its prey and went into the wall. It was a muskrat, the head and part of the fore legs torn off and gone, but the rest still fresh and quite heavy, including hind legs and tail. It had probably killed this muskrat in the brook, eaten so much, and was dragging the remainder to its retreat in the wall.

A fine clear afternoon after the misty morning and heavy rain of the night. Even after all this rain I see the streaming lines of gossamer from trees and fences. From Fair Haven Hill the air is clear and fine-grained, and now it is a perfect russet November landscape - including the reddish brown of the oaks, excepting where the winter-rye fields and some low meadows show their green, the former quite bright, and also the evergreen patches of pines, edged in the northwest by the blue mountain ridges.

1855

Twitter Updates
follow Thoreau on Twitter

Other Entries

January 4
January 6
January 7
January 10
January 11
January 21
January 23
January 24
January 27
January 29
January 30
February 3
February 6
February 9
February 21
February 23
February 25
March 1
March 4
March 5
March 7
March 11
March 12
March 13
March 14
March 15
March 19
March 27
March 29
March 31
April 1
April 3
April 7
April 9
April 11
April 19

May 1
May 3
May 7
May 9
May 10
May 11
May 16
May 19
May 20
May 24
May 26
May 27
May 29
May 31
June 3
June 9
June 10
June 11
June 14
June 16
July 4
July 15
August 13
August 15
August 16
August 18
August 20
August 22
August 23
September 1
September 26
September 29


June 3
June 9
June 10
June 11
June 14
June 16
July 4
July 15
July 24
August 13
August 15
August 16
August 18
August 20
August 22
August 23
September 1
September 15
September 26
September 29
October 11
October 13
October 20
October 23
October 24
October 26
Occtober 27
October 29
October 30
November 1
November 6
November 8
November 9
November 10
November 11
November 13
November 14
November 20
November 25
November 26
November 27
December 2
December 6
December 16
December 17
December 19
December 31




Outrider