M Hofferber Books



Ranching, Endangered Species, And Urbanization in the Southwest
Species Of Capital
by Nathan Freeman Sayre 
 
Ranching is as much a part of the West as its wide-open spaces. The mystique of rugged individualism has sustained this activity well past the frontier era and has influenced how we view--and value--those open lands.

Nathan Sayre takes a close look at how the ranching ideal has come into play in the conversion of a large tract of Arizona rangeland from private ranch to National Wildlife Refuge. He tells how the Buenos Aires Ranch, a working operation for a hundred years, became not only a rallying point for multiple agendas in the "rangeland conflict" after its conversion to a wildlife refuge but also an expression of the larger shift from agricultural to urban economies in the Southwest since World War II.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service bought the Buenos Aires Ranch in 1985, removed all livestock, and attempted to restore the land to its "original" grassland in order to protect an endangered species, the masked bobwhite quail.

Sayre examines the history of the ranch and the bobwhite together, exploring the interplay of social, economic, and ecological issues to show how ranchers and their cattle altered the land -- for better or worse -- during a century of ranching and how the masked bobwhite became a symbol for environmentalists who believe that the removal of cattle benefits rangelands and wildlife. 
Ranching, Endangered Species, And Urbanization in the Southwest
Ranching, Endangered Species, And Urbanization in the Southwest
Species Of Capital
by Nathan Freeman Sayre

University of Arizona Press, 2006
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